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Occasional Failure to Eject with 1911


Dead Head
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Check these usual suspects:

 

Gun dirty (check slide's "bolt" face and extractor hook).

Too much tension on extractor.  (Put a dummy round under the extractor with slide off the frame.  Shake slide.  If you can't shake the round loose, the extractor is tensioned too tightly)

Burr or sharp edge or poor angles on extractor tip

Ejector tip broken or ejector loose on frame

 

Badly burred or swollen cartridge case

Bad ammo with a real thick case "rim" or bent case rims

 

Since it is happening rarely (one every 300 or so rounds) it strongly suggests an ammo cause.  (Last two suspects above)

 

Good luck, GJ

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It is a good idea to gauge every round, mixed headstamps should not cause a problem.  Sounds like your load is adequate to operate the gun.

In addition to what G.J. stated the problem could be lack of lube on the slide rails or the operating spring (recoil spring) too strong.  Either of these problems will slow the slide and not let it move to the ejector with enough force.

 

Blackfoot

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What weight recoil spring is recommended for a Colt 1911 .45 ACP pistol shooting a 200 gr bullet going 830-845 fps (PF 166-169)?

 

That may be the issue as I have the original recoil spring in it that is probably designed for full power 230 gr loads.  I have no idea what weight it is.

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What weight recoil spring is recommended for a Colt 1911 .45 ACP pistol shooting a 200 gr bullet going 830-845 fps (PF 166-169)?

 

That may be the issue as I have the original recoil spring in it that is probably designed for full power 230 gr loads.  I have no idea what weight it is.

 

Traditionally, 16# is the factory spring for a .45 Auto and unless you have a MUCH heavier than that in it, you should not have the issue you're having because of the spring. I run 15-16# with my light loads and never have the issue.

As Tully mentioned check your extractor tunnel. I see a lot of issues from that being dirty.

Now is the Model 12 running?

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The part about "hard to get the fired case out from under the extractor" tells you a lot. 

 

That would not be a problem caused by too strong a recoil spring.  The case should be easy to peel off by hand if the ejector was not being hit by the case.

 

That would not be a problem with too light a load.  Case should be easy to take out then, too.

 

The things that a case stuck firmly under extractor does hint at:

rough case rim or swelled case or thick rim

dirty or burrred or out-of-shape extractor (or extractor channel)

over-tensioned extractor

really dirty slide face

 

Check those things FIRST.

 

Good luck, GJ

 

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Thanks to all for the input!  I do gauge all my rounds so that is not the issue.  I will inspect the rims for damage.

 

I did take the extractor out and I am ashamed to say that it was pretty gunky in there.  I got that whole channel cleaned out and did the firing pin area also.

 

I have ordered a 15 pound recoil spring and 14 pound recoil spring that are due Wednesday.  I think I will start with the 15 pound spring.  Between the cleaned up extractor and the slightly lighter recoil spring I hope all goes well on Friday at the Wild Bunch Mini-Match at the SASS Maine State Championships.

 

As everyone knows, shooting a Wild Bunch match without issues is a LOT more fun.

 

My Model 12 is running better, but I must not be running it as well as I could be as I had a round pop out during the 3 stage Wild Bunch at the SASS NH State Championships last weekend.  I can load a shotgun round a lot faster that I can clear a stuck .45 ACP case with rounds pushing up from below holding it in place.  I will work on shotgun this Friday also as it worked fine for Boggus Deal. 

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I have ordered a 15 pound recoil spring

 

The 1911 runs a balancing act between it's recoil and main springs.  Springs that are not balanced can lead to poor functioning of the gun.

 

The factory springs are 16# recoil and 23# main springs.  This matches factory and mil-spec ammo that makes about 190 Power Factor.

 

A 15# recoil runs well with about a 19# main spring.  (This is what I run in WB guns.)

 

I would guess a 14# recoil spring would like a 17# main spring.  But I have never had to go so light to get a Wild Bunch 1911 to function well (running about 160 Power Factor). 

 

Too light a recoil and main spring will toss empties more than 12 feet from the gun.  And sometimes bang up the mouth of the fired cases.

Too heavy a recoil and main spring set and the 1911 will just dribble cases out of the gun - 4 feet or less from where you stand.  Or even worse, have a few failures to eject the fired case.

 

Between those distances of ejected cases - the springs match the power factor of the ammo well, and the gun should both function reliably and not suffer battering of the frame or slide.

 

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I have ordered a 15 pound recoil spring

 

The 1911 runs a balancing act between it's recoil and main springs.  Springs that are not balanced can lead to poor functioning of the gun.

 

The factory springs are 16# recoil and 23# main springs.  This matches factory and mil-spec ammo that makes about 190 Power Factor.

 

A 15# recoil runs well with about a 19# main spring.  (This is what I run in WB guns.)

 

I would guess a 14# recoil spring would like a 17# main spring.  But I have never had to go so light to get a Wild Bunch 1911 to function well (running about 160 Power Factor). 

 

Too light a recoil and main spring will toss empties more than 12 feet from the gun.  And sometimes bang up the mouth of the fired cases.

Too heavy a recoil and main spring set and the 1911 will just dribble cases out of the gun - 4 feet or less from where you stand.  Or even worse, have a few failures to eject the fired case.

 

Between those distances of ejected cases - the springs match the power factor of the ammo well, and the gun should both function reliably and not suffer battering of the frame or slide.

Joe is correct on that ejection distance. The techs at Ruger say a spent round should land between 3' and 9' from the shooter, they may roll or bounce farther away but 3' to 9' is how far they should land from the shooter.

kR

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The 1911 worked well on Friday with two 28 round pistol stages and one 42 round pistol stage.  No failure to eject with my new 15 pound Wolff recoil spring and a cleaned-out extractor channel. 

 

And my Model 12 worked well on all three stages!

 

I'm making progress.

 

 

Good to hear!

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HI GANG. Yesterday at a WB match, a shooter had the slide closing on the loaded round before the round could chamber. Like it hit the case in the side and marked it. SO shooter tells me a maker in USA (custom maker I believe) That with full power loads to use 20 pound recoil spring. I strongly suggested that factory's install 16 or maybe 18 pound recoil springs and informed him I used 14 recoil and 19 hammer main spring. As my Smith and Wesson functioned perfectly the shooter is thinking of trying lighter recoil spring. My power factor is 162.
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